Krypt3ia

(Greek: κρυπτεία / krupteía, from κρυπτός / kruptós, “hidden, secret things”)

ASSESSMENT: Tesco.com Hack and Account Drop

with one comment

Screenshot from 2014-02-17 08:56:17

TESCO Dump:

Screenshot from 2014-02-17 09:04:27

Two thousand accounts and passwords to Tesco.com’s site were dumped on Pastebin 2/12/14 and it set the news all a twitter about how Tesco had been hacked. The accounts and passwords have all been deactivated and changed according to Tesco and if they had it their way I am sure they’d just like to move on. However, the news on the hack has as yet been unclear as to how it happened. In looking around the usual dirty corners of the internet I have found a few details about how common it seems companies like Tesco have been the target of these kinds of attacks. I found trails of chatter going back to August of last year talking about how to go about abusing the Tesco online system to order goods and have them delivered in many places as well as offers by coders for scripts and programs to carry out the attack that seems to have befallen Tesco.

Tesco_Checker.exe and Freelancers:

Screenshot from 2014-02-17 09:45:45

Screenshot from 2014-02-17 09:03:45

One of the first hits that I located was talk of a “Tesco Account Checker” program back in October of last year. I was unable (as yet) to locate the live download of the program but above you can see a screen shot of one of the common file sharing sites where it was hosted back then. This program allegedly checks the site by imputing user ID’s (emails) and passwords which it will check for a (200) on the site and output a report much like what was uploaded to Pastebin recently. In fact there are many offerings out there for these kinds of scripts and programs that will work on many sites and some of them have a brute force element as well. It has yet to be determined though if the Tesco event was an actual hack on their systems with something like these programs or if the Pastebin dump was just a shot over the bow from data gathered and tested with a new tool. Of course Tesco was also not very strong on their security for their passwords or their practices here with six character non complex passwords and a tendency to send pass resets in email clear text. These factors may also have been at play in this dump of the two thousand accounts actually occurring but it still doesn’t elucidate on why someone would just dump them there and not just use them.

Carding Forums:

 

Screenshot from 2014-02-17 09:07:05

Screenshot from 2014-02-17 09:07:23

Tied to the scripts and programs being created for the purpose of checking accounts at Tesco and other places, the carding forums make their appearance selling the data culled as well as giving short tutorials on how to check balances and such. As seen above there are at least two different groups of carders involved in this incident (v3ch4j.cc as well as tuxedocrew.biz) so it seems that perhaps it may have been more than 2k accounts compromised and may in fact be being sold on their closed markets today. It does seem though that these guys are in it for the purchase of goods then having them shipped as Tesco is an online super market. There are posts asking how to get food sent and how to scam the site to get that food so it seems that this has been going on for some time now. Tesco users may want to check into their accounts for small charges that may have gone unnoticed as well as Tesco themselves should be looking at a full scale DFIR on their systems to see just what has happened here.

ANALYSIS:

Screenshot from 2014-02-17 09:07:41

The overall analysis here is that Tesco was using insecure processes to generate passwords as well as reset them for people (in the clear in email) as well as perhaps had been under attack for some time (since last summer really) by these attackers. Probes of their site should have been noticed and one would hope that Tesco would have some sort of intelligence gathering to tell them when these types of campaigns are being created. My Googling only took about 15 minutes and I had a plethora of data on who was talking about this script as well as methods to cheat Tesco out of goods online. The upshot here is these guys weren’t really hiding very well and this stuff should be monitored. If they had been paying attention though they might have noticed Moad Abo Al Sheakh (G+ above) who posted a tutorial on using the Tesco account checking tool on his blog under the title “no secret her” and aside from his poor typing/spelling skills, lays it out pretty plainly. Overall this isn’t a Target attack on the scale of interesting but it does show just how poorly some places treat security as a primary goal only to get popped and dumped on Pastebin.

K.

Written by Krypt3ia

2014/02/17 at 15:26

Posted in ASSESSMENT, Hacking

One Response

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  1. I think perhaps more damaging is when insecure links go viral on deal & mommy blogs.
    Do not know if you read my tweets on what happened to a certain grocer this week or not. I would love to know how much that mess up cost. A lot of these bloggers do not know better and maybe would have posted steps just like that. It is the competition for traffic, to be the quickest,the first. Then blasted it to general public,aand a lot would not even think.

    OMG I saw people loading up $25 ecoupons on store cards and selling them. Store cards ..if they are going to be able to hold coupons and discounts..they need controls.

    This screw up went viral so fast it made my head spin.


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